Monarchs and Milkweeds

A WYOMING BIODIVERSITY CITIZEN SCIENCE INITIATIVE PROGRAM


More About Monarchs

Monarchs are easy to identify once you know what to look for. The viceroy butterfly mimics the look of the monarch to keep predators away, so can be mistaken for monarchs unless you look closely.

29dff8eb3d21a2a588d73a823c1bfecb_f15.jpgMonarchs (Danaus plexippus) are one of the most beloved butterfly species.  From their bright coloring that indicates "Warning - don't eat me - I taste bad!" to their total dependence on milkweed plants to raise their young, and from their long migrations done each year to their stained-glass window like pattern on their wings... there's almost nothing we can't appreciate about the monarch!

 

Monarchs are easy to identify once you know what to look for.  The viceroy butterfly mimics the look of the monarch to keep predators away, so can be mistaken for monarchs unless you look closely.

 

Download the ID Guide

22cf101d11e811474d459b26633a5955_f30.jpgClick to download the Printer-friendly, Monarchs and Milkweeds' Monarch Identification Guide to learn how to identify monarchs

 

 

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More Resources

To learn more about monarchs, visit the following online resources:

 



4927975966_d1bd6d17e1_z.pngLove this Project? Help Us Do More!

By engaging the public in citizen science projects like the Monarchs and Milkweeds, the Biodiversity Institute hopes we can better understand where monarchs travel through Wyoming, what time of year, how many, and whether they reproduce here.  We can also find where the 10+ species of milkweeds exist, see if they're hosts to any monarch young

Please consider supporting this project, and other citizen science projects across the Rocky Mountain Region with a donation to the Biodiversity Institute! 


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