The Berry Prairie Blog

Native Biodiversity in a Rooftop Landscape


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Aug 7, 2012, 7:52 PM
Now that the green roof is pulled up, it gives us a chance to take a look at the multiple layers that lie beneath the gravel and green. Here's a quick peak at a couple of those layers. The orange is the waterproof membrane.
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Jun 26, 2012, 7:59 PM
There hasn't been much progress on fixing the structure below the green roof, but we do know that there's a bunch of water sitting on the cement deck, and it can't stay there. It's sounding pretty ominous, but I'll report the final decision when there is one. The good news is nothing was damaged in the Vertebrate Collection!
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Jun 15, 2012, 8:10 PM
We don't have any updates on the state of the green roof. And the plants that are still comfortably situated on the green roof don't seem to care about the chaos that has erupted in their neighborhood.
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Jun 8, 2012, 8:21 PM
As mentioned before, the Vertebrate Collection suffered a near-disaster. The good news is that it appears that no specimens were damaged, in large part because of the state-of-the-art cabinets that were installed when the Berry Center was constructed.
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Jun 5, 2012, 8:53 PM
The green roof leaked over the weekend into the Vertebrate Collection. The Vertebrate Collection houses thousands of bird and mammal specimens from around the world, and we're all keeping our fingers crossed that water didn't get into the sealed cabinets to damage any of the specimens.
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Jun 1, 2012, 9:08 PM
The Berry Prairie is covered in flowers right now! But--they’re not all large and showy.
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May 31, 2012, 9:19 PM
The Casper Star Tribune (Wyoming's statewide newspaper) article, "Hike takes people to state’s only endangered plant," published today, discusses penstemons and the upcoming American Penstemon Society/Wyoming Native Plant Society meeting in Laramie on June 22-25. The endangered plant the article refers to is the Blowout Penstemon (Penstemon haydenii, shown right), found only in active sand dunes like those in central Wyoming.
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May 29, 2012, 9:27 PM
The Berry Prairie is alive with blooming plants. They're a variety of colors too - purple, yellow, white, blue, red. The red, white and blue ones I'm sure are feeling very patriotic - but the others are looking very stately as well. Take a gander!
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May 17, 2012, 9:56 PM
Laramie columbine - now blooming on the Berry Prairie - is a petite gem, whose native distribution is restricted to the Laramie Range of Albany and Converse counties. Aquilegia laramiensis was first collected by Aven Nelson in 1895 in the northern part of the Range, and a few years later much farther to the south, not too far from Laramie. Seventy years passed before botanists once again took up the search, relocating the original sites, and filling in some gaps.
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May 7, 2012, 4:50 PM
With more plant species coming into bloom every day (well, maybe not today, with our fresh snow), it’s time to dust off the field guides. There are lots of newer books available for wildflower identification, but here are a few suggestions from the tried-and-true category.

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